Hair Myths You Need to Ignore
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10 Hair Myths You Should Get Out of Your Head

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Hair Myths You Need to Ignore
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Rooting Out Misconceptions

There is a lot of information floating around out there about your hair and how to properly care for it. Brush it 100 times a day, don't blow dry it, pluck those grays, etc. But what should you actually believe? We looked to hairdressers as experts in the field to myth bust some common hair misconceptions in order to help you have the luscious locks you've been wanting.

Related: 12 DIY Hair Treatments to Refresh Your Locks for Fall

Myth: Brush, Brush and Brush Some More
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Myth: Brush, Brush and Brush Some More

Remember when your mom told you to brush 100 times a day for shiny, healthy hair? Turns out that is false. "Brushing your hair can actually be quite damaging (especially if your hair is wet)," says Hollee Wood, a licensed cosmetologist who's behind HolleewoodHair. "The brush bristles tend to get caught in small tangles that rip through your hair, resulting in breakage. It's best to remove tangles with a wide-tooth comb before going in with a brush." As an alternative, she says you should massage your scalp once a day for at least five minutes. This creates a healthier scalp environment and in turn stimulates hair growth.

Myth: You Should Switch Shampoo Because It Loses Its Effectiveness
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Myth: You Should Switch Shampoo Because It Loses Its Effectiveness

This is false. Wood says "There is no benefit whatsoever to doing this, besides the excuse to try new products." Alternatively, what does matter is the shampoo you are using. Cheaper shampoos contain wax fillers that cause build up on your hair. To alleviate this, use a clarifying shampoo once a week or use a higher-end shampoo without waxes and silicones that cause this buildup.

Myth: Split Ends Can Be Fixed
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Myth: Split Ends Can Be Fixed

False. "Heat styling, hair color, and even elemental damage (like the wind and sun) can wreck the cuticle over time, which makes your hair more susceptible to damage," says Wood. "Once your hair is at that point, there isn't a lot you can do to repair it besides cutting the damaged parts off." If a hair product is promising to repair your split ends, don't buy into it. They may mask the problem, but can't actually fix it. The only thing that can fix split ends is to trim them before they get too out of control, Wood says.

Myth: Trimming Your Hair Makes it Grow Faster
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Myth: Trimming Your Hair Makes it Grow Faster

False again. It's a common myth the trimmed hair grows at a faster rate than untrimmed hair, but Wood says otherwise. In fact, trims have no effect on the rate of growth at all, she says. That said, regular trims aren't a bad idea. "If you don't regularly trim your hair, you'll end up with split ends, which can lead to breakage. This can appear to make your hair grow slower, but doesn't actually change how fast your hair grows," Wood says. "However, regular trims do still have strong benefits. They help eliminate dead ends and give your hair an overall healthier appearance."

Myth: Men Inherit Baldness from Their Mother's Side
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Myth: Men Inherit Baldness from Their Mother's Side

This is false, according to Annette Moore from BoldBarber.com, a blog about all things hair, beards, and shears. "The truth is, baldness can be inherited from either your mom or dad's side of the family," Moore says. "Or, in some cases, it might skip a generation, meaning that men inherit baldness from their grandparents rather than parents." When it comes to baldness, as it is with many other traits, it's entirely genetic. The best thing you can do is embrace your changing looks.

Myth: Dandruff Is Caused by a Dry Scalp
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Myth: Dandruff Is Caused by a Dry Scalp

Turns out there is little truth to this. "Dandruff is usually caused by a type of fungus called Malassezia, which actually loves oily environments since it feeds on the oil that your scalp produces," says Moore. "So, the opposite is actually true. Most likely you have dandruff not because your scalp is dry but because it's oily." The best way to combat dandruff is with a shampoo that is specifically made to fight dandruff.

Myth: If You Pluck a Gray Hair Two More Will Grow Back in Its Place
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Myth: If You Pluck a Gray Hair Two More Will Grow Back in Its Place

This is untrue. "The act of plucking itself isn't to blame," says Dina Mahalli, a hair and skincare expert with Maple Holistics. "Once you get a gray hair, you're likely to end up seeing a few more." So there isn't really a way to stop gray hair from coming in, but you shouldn't pluck regardless. Plucking weakens your hair strand and over time cause it to stop growing back in altogether.

Myth: Stress Is Responsible for Gray Hair
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Myth: Stress Is Responsible for Gray Hair

Did your mom ever tell you, you were giving her gray hairs? This is actually a myth. Headaches maybe, but not gray hairs. "In truth, genetics and age have to do with the loss of melanin in your tresses — not stress," says Lina Buk, from Nail Art Gear. "Stress can cause hair to fall out to varying degrees, though, so if you're starting to go gray, those hairs might grow back silvery or white in color." To help prevent this, a strengthening shampoo can help reinforce your hair. You can also try relaxation techniques that alleviate stress and avoid the type of fallout that can make hair appear to gray faster.

Myth: The Right Products Make My Hair Look Healthier
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Myth: The Right Products Make My Hair Look Healthier

This is actually false. Instead what matters far more than what you put on your hair is what you put into your body to nourish it. If you're undernourished or not getting a balanced diet with plenty of zinc, vitamin D and iron, your hair will suffer since your body will be more worried about the health of your vital organs than your hair appearance. Bottom line, take care of yourself and your hair will reap the benefits.

Myth: Blow Drying Your Hair Is Bad for Its Health
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Myth: Blow Drying Your Hair Is Bad for Its Health

This is mind-blowingly false. It turns out that yes blasting your hair with high heat isn't great for it, but leaving it wet for extended periods of time — such as while it air dries — is more damaging. The reason is that the interior of the strands will swell and create even more damage than a blast of heat. Your best bet is to heat dry your hair on the lowest heat setting instead of letting it air dry or blasting it with high heat.

Related: Best Hair Dryers