charcoal grill
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Quiz: How Much Do You Actually Know About Grilling?

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You Love to Grill
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Bar-B-Q&A

The unmistakable sizzling, smoking, and smells of a cookout tells the neighborhood that summer is here. You know how awesome grill marks look on a perfectly cooked steak, you know that everyone is certain that their rub recipe is the best, and you know that Amazon makes it impossible not to stockpile accessories and gadgets especially for barbecuing — but how much do you really know about grilling? Let's find out.

Related: 27 Barbecue Recipes and Tricks From Celebrity Chefs

Charcoal
DustyPixel/istockphoto

When did the world first meet the charcoal briquette?

A. 1855
B. 1897
C. 1917
D. 1923

Hot Coals
Андрей Клеменков/istockphoto

B: 1897

In 1897, Ellsworth B. A. Zwoyer secured the first patent for charcoal briquettes, but Henry Ford stole his thunder when he created the Kingsford Products Company in 1921. Ford didn't care about cookouts. The venture was merely a way to make money off the sawdust and wood scraps from his Model T assembly lines.

American BBQ
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What event launched America's barbecue craze?

A: The Great Depression
B: The rise of skyscrapers
C: Victory in World War II
D: The moon landing

historic grill
jon666/istockphoto

C: Victory in World War II

The expansion of the suburbs in the post-war boom years fueled the rise of the backyard cookout as an American tradition. In the late 1940s, most cookouts featured open brazier grills, the most basic kind of grill consisting of a cooking grid over a charcoal pan, which is also the least efficient and least predictable. Meat that was burnt on the outside and raw on the inside was common — as was a whole lot of ash.

Weber Original Kettle Premium 22" Charcoal Grill
Amazon

True or false? The first modern grill was a Weber.

A. True
B. False

charcoal grill
Imagesines/istockphoto

A: True

Unlike Henry Ford, George Stephen had a passion for barbecue, and he made the brazier grill obsolete when he invented the closed kettle grill in 1952. Back then, it was called Weber Bros. Metal Works, a sheet-metal shop in Chicago. Stephen, who was running the company, cut a buoy in half, attached legs to the bottom and a handle to the top, and the covered kettle grill was born. With the addition of a vent to regulate air intake and temperature, the Weber grill launched barbecue into the modern era and made Weber the biggest name in grilling.

Related: The Best Grills Under $300

Backyard Gas Grill
Maksym Ponomarenko/istockphoto

True or false? The gas grill was invented to make grilling easier.

A. True
B. False

Prepare The Propane
Maudib/istockphoto

B: False

Gas grills were and still are more expensive to buy but easier to use, but that wasn't important to the duo who intended them. In the 1960s, Arkansas Louisiana Gas Company employees William G. Wepfer and Melton Lancaster developed the propane grill as a way to get more people to buy more gas. It worked. Gas grills now account for 64% of grill sales in the U.S.

bbq sign
Onfokus/istockphoto

The term 'barbecue' comes from a culture indigenous to:

A. Africa
B. China
C. Spain
D. The Americas

barbacoa
MarisaMurillo/istockphoto

D: The Americas

The Arawak Indians on the Island of Hispaniola used the word "barbacoa" to describe the process of cooking strips of meat over grates made from wood. The Spanish co-opted the word, which was then co-opted by the English, who changed it to its current form, "barbecue."

gourmet meal
ClarkandCompany/istockphoto

Which slang term for luxurious living comes from the world of barbecue?

A. "Living large"
B. "Upper crust"
C. "High on the hog"
D. "Lap of luxury"

cuts of pig
Man_Half-tube/istockphoto

C: 'High on the hog'

Although it's not certain when exactly the term came into the language, "high on the hog" is both a metaphor and a literal phrase. It indicates the preferred cuts of meat from the top part of a pig — the shoulder and upper leg. Those were reserved for the wealthy elite. The peasantry ate cuts located lower down on the hog, like trotters and pork belly.

Related: 11 Inexpensive Meats for Summer Grilling

Filet Mignon
mphillips007/istockphoto

Filet mignon is taken from which cut of beef?

A. Ribeye
B. Porterhouse
C. Tenderloin
D. Chuck roast

Pork
mphillips007/istockphoto

C: Tenderloin

Taken from the smaller end of the tenderloin, filet mignon is one of the most famous and most expensive cuts of beef you can buy. Since it contains almost no fat, barbecue chefs should always make sure never to overcook it. When done right, you can cut through it with a fork.

Related: 17 Places to Order Pork, Steaks, and Other Meats Online

fresh t-bone steak
ahirao_photo/istockphoto

Which cut contains both a strip and a tenderloin?

A. London broil
B. Skirt steak
C. Brisket
D. Porterhouse

Porterhouse steak
GMVozd/istockphoto

D: Porterhouse

Similar to a T-bone, which is cut from the front of the loin and contains less filet mignon, Porterhouse steaks are cut from the back. One of the most prized cuts of meat on the menu, the porterhouse is distinguished by the T-bone that separates the large strip steak from the smaller tenderloin.

Shish Kebab
Timolina/shutterstock

The term 'shish kebab' comes from which country?

A. Turkey
B. Israel
C. Pakistan
D. Indonesia

Turkish Kebabs
by sonmez/istockphoto
burnt ends barbecue
bhofack2/istockphoto

Burnt ends are a trademark dish from what regional American style of barbecue?

A. Alabama
B. Kansas City
C. East Texas
D. Memphis

Kansas City, Missouri
Tupungato/shutterstock

B: Kansas City

Kansas City's status as a meatpacking hub gives it a long tradition of barbecue greatness. The hallmarks are thick, syrupy sauces and slow, low cooking over hickory wood. The style's signature dish is burnt ends, which come from the fatty ends of brisket.

Curious about other regional barbecue styles? Be sure to check out the Best Hole-in-the-Wall BBQ Joints Across America.

Memphis, Tennessee
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What is Memphis-style barbecue famous for?

A. Pork
B. Chicken
C. Beef
D. Shrimp

Memphis-Style Barbecue Ribs
Jay S./Yelp

A: Pork

Made with a dry rub cooked in a large pit, Memphis-style barbecue is all about pork. Usually served with a tangy sauce, Memphis-style ribs can be served on the bone, but the signature dish is pulled pork.

Related: 15 Fantastic Regional Rib Recipes

pig with apple
Carnegie42/istockphoto

An apple is placed in the mouth of a whole pig on a spit roast to:

A. Keep the mouth open to let gas escape
B. Smoke the apple
C. Balance the pig's head as it turns
D. Make it look less ghoulish

pig with apple in mouth close up
scalatore1959/istockphoto

D: Make it look less ghoulish

The classic apple in the pig's mouth is purely for aesthetics at firehouse pig roasts. Although there are many misconceptions and myths surrounding the origin of the tradition, the reality is pretty simple. The apple prevents the pig's mouth from tightening into a painful-looking grimace.

Home-Ground Burgers
Fudio/istockphoto

True or false? You should always press down on burgers as they cook on the grill.

A. True
B. False

grilling burgers
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Barbecue Sauce Ribs
luchezar/istockphoto

The first known reference to barbecue sauce comes from:

A. Ancient Rome
B. Ancient Greece
C. Ancient China
D. Ancient Mesopotamia

Chinese barbecue ribs
lsvvsl/istockphoto

C: Ancient China

In 239 B.C., Chinese chef I Yin used dramatic and flowery language to describe the use of sauces to improve the flavor of cooked meat. He wrote a passage in "Master LÙ's Spring and Autumn Annals" about the harmonious blending of ingredients that were salty, pungent, bitter, sour, and sweet.

Related: 25 Finger-Licking Barbecue Sauce Recipes

Barbecue Sauce
HandmadePictures/istockphoto

Annual barbecue sauce sales in the United States equal roughly:

A. $100 million
B. $300 million
C. $600 million
D. $900 million

Barbecue Sauce
Cheapism
american family grilling
jacoblund/istockphoto

How many Americans own a grill or smoker?

A. 25%
B. 50%
C. 70%
D. 90%

You Love to Grill
rez-art/istockphoto
barbecue grate
Adam Höglund/istockphoto

How much meat can the world's largest grill cook at one time?

A. 100 pounds
B. 1,000 pounds
C. 5,000 pounds
D. 4 tons

grilling ribs
YinYang/istockphoto

D. 4 tons

In 2015, a man from Texas, not surprisingly, bought the world's largest barbecue pit for $350,000. The "Undisputable Cuz" stretches 75 feet, can be mounted on a semi-truck, weighs 40 tons, and has seven smokestacks, 24 doors, and a walk-in cooler for beer kegs.

George Foreman GRP472P
Amazon

How many George Foreman Grills have been sold?

A. 1 million
B. 10 million
C. 50 million
D. 100 million

George Foreman Indoor-Outdoor 15+ Serving Domed Electric Grill
Walmart

D: 100 Million

Boxing legend George Foreman had nothing to do with inventing the grill that bears his name, but he did prove to be one of the greatest pitchmen in sports marketing history. In the 1990s, the Salton company's small electric grill was just another gadget on the home goods market. In 1997, George Foreman was actually still fighting professionally in the heavyweight division at the age of 48. When the two joined forces, however, marketing magic happened, the Foreman Grill went global, and Foreman made upwards of $200 million on more than 100 million units sold.

summer barbecue
manonallard/istockphoto

What is America's most popular grilling holiday?

A. The Fourth of July
B. Memorial Day
C. Flag Day
D. Labor Day

independence day in back yard
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A: The Fourth of July

About 73% of Americans barbecue on Independence Day, according to the Hearth, Patio, and Barbecue Association. The next biggest cookout holidays are Memorial Day (60%) and Labor Day (58%). Mother's Day and Father's Day rank high, too, but the tradition isn't limited to only the warm months. About 23% of the country barbecues during the Super Bowl, which takes place in February. About 10% hold cookouts on Christmas or Hanukkah.

Related: Can't Get Ground Beef? This Meatless Burger Fooled Our Tasters