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Lies Real Estate Agents Tell

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Deception, Deception, Deception

The housing market has gotten pretty competitive, inspiring some real estate agents to finesse their way into contracts in roundabout ways. From harmless exaggerations to misleading, downright lies, here are some common fabrications told by real estate agents. Have you come across others? Let us know in the comments.


Related: Secrets Realtors Don’t Want You to Know

Mid adult realtor evaluates a property for sale
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'Your House Is Definitely Worth That'

Homeowners often think their homes are worth more than they actually are — wishful thinking isn’t new. Your real estate agent might also be telling you what you want to hear when it comes to the value of your home, a white lie that can backfire when it comes to the appraisal process. If your home doesn’t appraise for the offer amount, it can undo a deal.


Related: Home Values Have Skyrocketed in These Cities

Agents are using pens pointing to contracts and are being explained to customers at the office.
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'Sorry, My Commission Is Fixed'

Commissions — or brokerage fees — are designed to be negotiable, but many agents try to convince clients their rates are set in stone. Going with the broker who has the lowest fees isn’t necessarily the best way to go, though, as agents with lower commissions typically don’t sell homes for as much as those with higher rates.


Related: Buying a home? Ignore This Outdated Advice

estate agent showround
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'Other Buyers Are Interested'

This lie isn’t really all that harmful, but it’s still a lie. Brokers might make you think other buyers are interested in the same home you’re considering in the hopes of speeding your decision.


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Real Estate Agent and Prospective Buyers at Open House
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'Open Houses Are Key to Selling'

There are pros and cons to open houses, but some agents might try to make you think they’re essential to selling a home. Not only is it a hassle to clean and be out of the house for an extended period, but the outcome of open houses is pretty bleak, statistically: Only 7% of buyers found their home by attending an open house or seeing a yard sign, according to the National Association of Realtors.

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'Homes Like This Are My Specialty'

Whether you’re trying to sell a condo, a waterfront property, or a luxury home, you might hear your agent claim to be an expert. They might exaggerate their experience in a specialty to give clients a false sense of confidence in their ability to sell; you can call their agency to ask for their transaction history if you’re unsure.

Old cement house
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'I Think That House Is Beautiful!'

Born out of a desire to keep clients confident and happy, this lie is probably the most well-meaning. When clients fall in love with a home their agents don't see much beauty in, many agents will enthusiastically assure buyers that they’ve landed on a gorgeous home rather than share the ugly truth.


Related: Weird and Wacky Property Listings That'll Leave You Scratching Your Head

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'This Neighborhood Is Up-and-Coming'

Not all developing neighborhoods end up being great places to live, and it’s hard to gauge the outcome in the early stages. But that doesn’t stop agents from pushing new developments on buyers like they’re the latest iPhone. Tread lightly if you’re considering buying in a place that’s “up-and-coming.”

Young business people using tablet discussing the future structure of the company at meeting.
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'You Won’t Find Everything You’re Looking for Within Your Budget'

When it comes to buying a home, you should have a list of things you’re looking for that your agent follows to present you with properties. Sometimes they’ll say that you can’t check every box within your budget; that could be true if your wish list includes a bathroom with a solid gold toilet, but if your requests and spending limit are reasonable, your agent probably lacks confidence in their ability to secure you your dream home — or just want you to buy a more expensive listing.

Banker business man shaking hands with client and sign contrac document for comfirm corporation or finished loan agreement for house or building property.Document in photo is fake only for stock phoot.
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'I Have Buyers Lined Up For Your Home If You List With Me …'

… And if they disappear once you move forward, it’s a coincidence, right? Some agents will try to secure your business by convincing you they’ve got your home sold before you even agree to use them. And who wouldn’t be tempted? Just remember that there aren’t a lot of buyers out there for homes they’ve never seen.

For Sale By Owner Sign and House
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'Never List Your Home as 'For Sale By Owner'

Real estate agents might tell you that “for sale by owner” is a dangerous move, warning you against listing your home yourself. But selling your own home has benefits, such as not having to pay commissions. It makes sense that agents would tell owners to avoid selling their homes without them — they want the business, after all.

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'Staging Your Home Is Worth the Cost'

Spending money to stage a home can be a good investment, but not always. Staging requires significant upfront costs, such as for renting furniture, and it can add up quickly if your home doesn’t fly right off the market, Forbes Advisor notes. Not to mention that all of your belongings have to go somewhere else while your home is staged.

Business people signing a contract.
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'I Have An Extensive Track Record'

Everyone has to start somewhere, including real estate agents. But some clients might want an old pro handling their listing, and agents might exaggerate their experience to make people feel more comfortable.

House for sale, pending sign. Front yard. No people.
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'We Can’t Wait to Put An Offer In'

It’s true that the current housing market is a whirlwind. The “For Sale” sign you see one day might be a “Sale Pending” sign the next. But if your real estate agent tells you that you have to put an offer in immediately to be considered, watch out. It’s a big decision to make hastily.

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'I’ll Be With You Every Step of the Way'

Most agents are very involved and great about sticking with clients from start to finish. Others might tell you they’ll be available but not follow through. After taking into account why, you might have no choice but to warn them you’re forced to find another agent, the Real Estate Info Guide advises.