Cup of Black Tea Served with Biscuits
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Best Teas for People Who Don't Drink Tea

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Warm green tea on a wooden table.
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Capital Tea

As the weather cools, curling up and enjoying a nice cup of tea is one of life's great simple pleasures. If you aren't a tea drinker, or usually opt for coffee, these versatile teas might change your mind. From teas best suited for weight loss and detoxing to ones that can help stave off a cold by helping boost the immune system, these delicious hot potions will have you reaching for the kettle for more. 


Related: Costco Vs. Trader Joe's Boba Tea Face-Off


Black tea
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English Breakfast Tea

Research suggests that black tea — rich in antioxidants — might lower cortisol levels and help prevent strokes, heart disease, and even cancer. This English Breakfast tea is full-bodied and smooth, making it a perfect substitute to coffee. Try adding a dash of your favorite milk and a spoonful of honey for a creamy, sweet finish.


Related: The Best Tea-Filled Advent Calendars for a Calming Christmas Countdown

Matcha green tea
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Matcha Green Tea

If you haven't jumped on the Matcha bandwagon, what are you waiting for? Matcha tea has seen a spike in popularity in recent years, with food bloggers and influencers marveling at its health benefits and high caffeine content. Matcha is made from the same leaves as green tea, but comes in a finely ground powder; it's also easy to prepare — just mix with milk or water. 


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Ginger root tea with lemon, honey and mint
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Ginger Tea

From soothing a sore throat to helping stave off a cold, ginger is known for its immune boosting and anti-inflammatory health properties. To unleash the most benefits from a ginger tea, try mixing it with honey and lemon juice whenever you're feeling under the weather.

Green Tea
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Green Tea

Originated in China in the 18th century, green tea has a slightly sweet taste and is known for its digestive benefits. It's also loaded with antioxidants that promote cardiovascular health and helps reduce inflammation. Try combining honey and ginseng for added health benefits. 

Hot medicinal valerian drink - Valeriana officinalis
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Valerian Root Tea

If you suffer from insomnia, valerian root tea may be the answer to your woes. Known for its sleep-inducing properties, this herbal tea is caffeine-free and can help you catch some Zs. 

Masala chai tea on a dark background closeup. Traditional Indian hot drink with milk and spices. Top view, flat lay.
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Chai

Originated in India, chai is strong, full-bodied, and packs quite a bit of caffeine. Made from combining black tea and a blend of cinnamon, cardamom, black pepper, and clove, this tea is fragrant and delicious. Traditionally, it is steeped slowly with milk, but you can  make it with hot water; add some honey or agave to sweeten, and garnish with star anise and powdered cinnamon. 

Brewing herbal tea
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Pu-erh Tea

If you're trying to shed a few pounds, pu-erh tea is the way to go. By helping your body burn fat, pu-erh tea is ideal for those looking to give their metabolism a jump-start. It also helps reduce inflammation and has almost as much caffeine as a cup of coffee. To maximize its weight-loss enhancing properties, drink it without sweeteners. 

Moroccan mint tea
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Moroccan Mint Tea

As delicious as it is refreshing, mint tea was traditionally enjoyed after a meal to help digestion in North African countries. You can also enjoy it as a rejuvenating drink in the morning, hot or cold. Traditional Moroccan mint tea is made from combining gunpowder tea leaves, fresh mint, and sugar. 

Process brewing tea, tea ceremony, Cup of freshly brewed fruit and herbal tea, dark mood. Hot water is poured from the kettle into a cup with tea leaves.
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Echinacea and Elderberry Tea

Known for their powerful immune-boosting properties, echinacea and elderberry come highly recommended to help keep the flu at bay, especially during winter months. Elderberry is sweet and tart and is best enjoyed with a dash of honey; sprinkle some turmeric powder for an extra boost of antioxidants.

Glass cup of brewed black turkish tea, traditional hot drink concept
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Rooibos Tea

A sweet, nutty herbal tea with a smooth finish, rooibos is full-bodied and rich. It has warm, woody notes and is packed with antioxidants such as calcium, iron, magnesium, vitamin C, and zinc. This tea is caffeine-free and can help improve digestion and promote restful sleep.

Herbal chamomile tea and chamomile flowers near teapot and tea glass on wooden table. Countryside background.
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Chamomile Tea

Don't skip out on this classic just because it seems kind of bland. Chamomile is a light herbal tea that is caffeine-free with a floral undertone and a slightly sweet natural finish. Research suggests that chamomile is packed with antioxidants and can help keep your heart healthy.