Simple Ways to Cook Eggs
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13 Simple Ways to Cook Eggs

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Simple Ways to Cook Eggs
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Easy Egg Dishes

Soft or hard, fried or baked, poached or scrambled: There are many different ways to cook eggs, making them a perfect dish to serve at breakfast or any time of day. They're one of the least expensive and most versatile sources of animal protein. A few good tips to keep in mind when cooking eggs: Try to use nonstick cookware, since cast-iron skillets can react chemically with egg whites, turning eggs a harmless — but unappetizing — green. The best way to test an egg for freshness is to put it in the bottom of a bowl of water; fresh eggs rest on their sides, while questionable eggs float. With fresh eggs at the ready, here are more than a dozen different ways to cook eggs. 


Related: 20 Ways to Jazz Up Your Oatmeal

Hard-Boiled Eggs
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Hard-Boiled Eggs

Preparation: For easy-to-peel shells, boil eggs that have been sitting in the refrigerator for a few days. Cover raw eggs in a pot with cool water, up to one or two inches above the eggs. Bring the water to a full, rolling boil. Turn off the heat and let the eggs sit in the water for 15 minutes. Remove the hard-boiled eggs from the water and submerge in a bowl of ice water. 


Use it in a recipe: Bon Appetit


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soft boiled egg
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Soft-Boiled Eggs

Preparation: Follow the directions for hard-boiled eggs, but let the eggs sit in the water for two to three minutes. Place the soft-boiled egg in an eggcup with the smaller end facing upward. Gently crack the shell near the top and either scoop out the runny insides with a spoon or dip toast directly inside the soft, runny parts of the egg.


Use it in a recipe: Martha Stewart


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Poached Eggs
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Poached Eggs

Preparation: Fill a saucepan with two inches of water. Add one-half teaspoon vinegar and bring to a simmer. Break a fresh egg into a small cup or bowl. When the water is simmering, stir it gently to create a slow whirlpool in the center of the pan. Slide the egg into the water (don't let it touch the bottom). Cook the egg for about two minutes for a runny yolk, and four minutes for a firm yolk. Remove the poached egg with a slotted spoon and place on paper towel to absorb excess water. 


Use it in a recipe: Pinch of Yum


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Deviled or Stuffed Eggs
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Deviled Eggs

Preparation: Cut hard-boiled eggs in half lengthwise and scoop out the yolks. In a bowl, combine the yolks and two tablespoons vegetable oil, one tablespoon lemon juice or vinegar, one-half teaspoon table salt, one-half teaspoon freshly ground pepper, and one-and-a-half teaspoons yellow or spicy brown mustard. Mash together until smooth. Spoon the mixture back inside the yolk-less egg whites and sprinkle with paprika. Serve immediately or store in the refrigerator for up to three days. 


Use it in a recipe: Taste of Home


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Fried Eggs
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Fried Eggs

Preparation: Melt one tablespoon of butter or cooking oil in a nonstick frying pan over medium-high heat. If using cooking spray instead, heat the pan until a drop of water sizzles instantly and evaporates on contact, then spray. Carefully break the egg into the pan so the yolk and the egg white don't mix, and immediately turn the heat to medium-low. Once the white has set completely, flip it over carefully. Cook for another one to three minutes until the yolk reaches the desired firmness and is less runny. Serve fried eggs immediately with toast to mop up any leftover yolk. 


Use it in a recipe: Food52

Sunny-Side-Up Eggs
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Sunny-Side-Up Eggs

Preparation: Add one tablespoon of butter or cooking oil to a nonstick frying pan over medium-high heat. When the butter is melted and sizzling, break the egg, pour it into the pan, and turn the heat immediately to medium-low. The transparent white of the raw egg will solidify and whiten as the egg cooks. If preferred, spoon some of the oil or melted butter in the pan over the egg white (but not the yolk) while the egg is cooking to add flavor. 


Use it in a recipe: Food.com

Scrambled Eggs
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Scrambled Eggs

Preparation: Beat two eggs in a bowl with two tablespoons of milk or cream. (The dairy makes the eggs creamier and less bland, but it is optional.) Pour into a hot, buttered pan. Let the eggs sit for half a minute to a minute, until the bottom starts to set. Add pepper and salt to taste, along with any additional ingredients. Use a silicone spatula or wooden spoon to move the eggs gently around the pan. After a minute or two, the eggs should start forming "curds" in the pan. When the eggs still look wet but there's no more liquid in the pan, turn off the heat. 


Use it in a recipe: Lady & Pups

Omelet
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Omelet

Preparation: In a mixing bowl, whisk together two eggs, two tablespoons of milk or cream, and one-quarter teaspoon each of salt and pepper until blended. Beat well for a fluffier omelet. Melt two tablespoons of butter in a nonstick pan over medium heat until sizzling. Pour in the egg scramble and let sit for a minute or two, until the bottom starts to set. Use a spatula to spread the eggs gently and evenly around the pan. When the top starts to set, pour one-third cup of fillings such as shredded cheese, diced ham or bacon, avocado, and other ingredients over half of the omelet. Flip the empty half over the fillings and serve immediately.


Use it in a recipe: The Mom 100

Baked Eggs Recipe
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Baked Eggs

Preparation: Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. For each serving, break two eggs into a greased ramekin or muffin tin. Spoon one tablespoon milk or cream over the eggs, making sure to cover them evenly, and sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste. Bake for about 15 minutes, or until the eggs are set and baked to perfection. 


Use it in a recipe: Love & Lemons

Quiche
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Quiche

Preparation: Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Beat four eggs and one cup milk or cream in a mixing bowl. Add one teaspoon salt, one teaspoon onion powder, and one-half teaspoon cayenne pepper, and beat again. Sprinkle one cup shredded cheddar cheese over the bottom of a 9-inch pie crust and pour the contents of the bowl carefully over it. (A sharp cheese is preferable; mild cheeses are more likely to be overwhelmed by the other ingredients.) Bake for 15 minutes on the center rack. Turn the oven down to 300 degrees and bake for another 35 minutes until crispy. Let the baked quiche sit an additional 10 minutes before eating. 


Use it in a recipe: Bake to the Roots


Related: Classic, Budget-Friendly French Dishes

French Toast
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French Toast

Preparation: Mix eight eggs and one-third cup of milk in a bowl; spices such as nutmeg are optional. Soak slices of bread in the mixture for two to three minutes per side. Heat slices until golden brown on a lightly greased, large, nonstick skillet over high heat. Any bread will work, including slightly stale bread, and you can get creative with mix-ins and toppings.


Use it in a recipe: All Day I Dream About Food

Toad-in-the-Hole
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Toad-in-the-Hole

Preparation: Cut a hole in a slice of bread, and toast each side in a lightly oiled skillet. Break an egg into the hole, then cover the pan and let it sit for roughly five minutes so the eggs set. Salt and pepper to taste afterward.


Use it in a recipe: Allrecipes

Microwave Eggs
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Microwave Scramble

Preparation: Coat a mug or ramekin with cooking spray. Beat an egg with your choice of ingredients — frozen shredded hash browns, cheese, tomato or salsa, spinach — then microwave on high for 30 seconds. Stir and give the dish another 30 seconds of microwaving, give or take, so the egg sets. 


Use it in a recipe: Spend with Pennies


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