Beloved Candies From Childhood That No Longer Exist
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Beloved Candies From Childhood That No Longer Exist

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Beloved Candies From Childhood That No Longer Exist
Cheapism

The Sweetest Memories

Few places were as magical for a child than the candy aisle. Whether you surveyed your options at a general store with colorful penny candy or a convenience store with endless rows of chips and chocolate bars, choosing a treat was almost as impossible as convincing your parents to buy it. Is your favorite pick still on the shelves? Here are some goodies we’d love to see make a comeback.


Related: The Forgotten History Behind Your Favorite Candies

Oh Henry!
Amazon

Oh Henry!

Close your eyes and you can taste it: Peanuts, caramel, and fudge — a mainstay of your childhood sweet tooth. Oh Henry! bars were a hit soon after their introduction by a Chicago candy company all the way back in 1920. And while it appears that there are still some Oh Henry! bars lurking around Canada, the brand’s new U.S. owner, Ferrara, pulled the plug on this classic after buying it from Nestle a few years ago. 


Related: Foods Americans are Missing Out On 

Marathon Bar
Etsy
Ice Blue Mint Coolers
Amazon

Ice Blue Mint Coolers

Candy Favorites proclaims these bright blue discs, made with real peppermint oil, “one of the best-selling hard candies of all time.” Even so, this refreshing candy-dish mainstay is no longer listed among Brach’s array of treats, leaving us with those ubiquitous red-and-white Star Brites peppermints to freshen our breath instead. If you're willing to settle for an approximation, Old Time Candy offers its own Ice Blue Mint Squares, alongside a bevy of other brand name treats you ate as a kid — sweet enthusiasts can even shop by decade.


Related: Candymakers With Treats Almost Too Pretty to Eat

Seven Up Bar
eBay

Seven Up Bar

Seven Ups were produced by Trudeau Candy, then Pearson’s, starting in the 1930s. As candy bars go, they were ambitious: Each one had seven sections filled with a different flavor, from orange and mint to caramel and nougat. But they were costly to produce, and disappeared by the end of the ‘70s. The closest thing available today, according to Old Time Candy: The Sky Bar, which was recently brought back to life after maker Necco folded in 2018.


Related: Wonder Bread, Wheaties, and Other Popular Foods That Turned 100 This Year

Wonka Bar
Amazon

Wonka Bar

Released in the early ‘70s to coincide with the movie “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory,” Wonka Bars weren’t exactly a runaway hit: Made by candy newbie Quaker, they often melted during shipping. Though subsequently passed off from company to company, they managed to stick around for years, especially as the movie went on to attain cult-classic status. Sadly, the bars were discontinued by Nestle in 2011. While Ferrara currently makes a few Wonka favorites including Everlasting Gobstoppers, the Wonka Bar is nowhere to be found.


Related: 50 Things Turning 50 This Year


Bonkers
Wikimedia Commons

Bonkers

Kids of the ‘80s and ‘90s probably remember sinking their teeth into these fruity, chewy, oh-so-sticky candies that were probably hated by dentists everywhere. (And who could forget the commercials of giant pieces of fruit crushing candy lovers from above?) While Bonkers fell off the radar for a long time, Leaf Brands bought the brand several years ago. However, there’s still little sign of a renaissance anytime soon. Leaf is still promising a comeback in … well … 2015.


Related: The Worst Halloween Candies For Your Teeth

Walnettos
Wikimedia Commons

Walnettos

These fat, chewy squares of caramel and walnuts were especially popular in the ‘20s, ‘30s, and ‘40s, but if you remember them from the ‘60s or ‘70s, there’s a good reason for that: “Want a Walnetto?” was often tossed out as a one-liner by dirty old man Tyrone on “Laugh-In.” They were last made by a company in California, but judging by the distinct lack of Walnettos available online today, the brand may have reached the end of its stored history.


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Sugar Mama
Amazon

Sugar Mama

You can still get a toothache from a Sugar Daddy, the ubiquitous caramel lollipop, as well as its bite-size companions, Sugar Babies. But whatever happened to Sugar Mama? This chocolate-coated version of the Sugar Daddy was produced starting in 1965, according to Old Time Candy, and was eventually discontinued in the ‘80s. Today, Tootsie Roll produces Sugar Daddy and Sugar Babies, with no signs of bringing mama back into the family.


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Space Dust/Cosmic Candy
Redbubble

Space Dust/Cosmic Candy

What kid could resist an out-of-this-world treat called Space Dust? Introduced in the ‘70s, Space Dust was essentially a fine-grain version of Pop Rocks, which are still widely available today. This “sizzling candy” ran into problems, though, with parents complaining the powdery substance was a little too reminiscent of illegal drugs, according to Gone But Not Forgotten Groceries. That prompted a name change to “Cosmic Candy,” but rumors persisted, and the candy eventually disappeared. 


Related: Urban Legends About Popular Foods Debunked

PB Max
Wikimedia Commons

PB Max

Launched in 1989 by Mars, the PB Max was true to its name: Peanut butter — lots of it — slathered onto a whole-grain cookie, surrounded by chocolate. A square standout in a sea of rectangular bars, it tasted vaguely homemade, and the commercials reminding everyone what “PB” stood for (not “pineapple beanie,” not “pet barracuda”) are certainly memorable. Still, PB Max disappeared in the mid-90s, and you can join others pining for a reboot on its Facebook fan page


Pom Poms
eBay

Pom Poms

These balls of chocolate and caramel were a precursor of Milk Duds. First made by Welch’s, then Nabisco, they were a mainstay at movie theaters, just like their still-in-production siblings, Junior Mints and Sugar Babies, according to Retroist. Tootsie Roll acquired the brand in the early ‘90s, and despite churning out many old-school favorites (Charleston Chew or Dots, anyone?), Pom Poms bit the dust.


Peanut Butter Oompas
Candy Wrapper Museum
Summit Bar
Candy Wrapper Museum

Summit Bar

Another erstwhile Mars candy spawned in the ‘70s, Summit Bars were chocolate-covered wafers and peanuts, twin-wrapped just like a Twix. Take a look at this time-capsule of a commercial touting Summit as the source of “peanuts, wafers, and light” from 1979 to jog your memory. But Summit bars were quick to melt, and even though they were reformulated, they disappeared by the mid-’80s. 

Chicken Dinner Bar
Candy Wrapper Museum

Chicken Dinner Bar

You’ll have to hop in the wayback machine to remember the Chicken Dinner bar, produced from the 1920s through the 1960s. And while it contained no actual poultry (whew), it was stuffed with nuts and marketed as nutritious, much like a granola bar or protein bar would be today. Because of that, it even earns a spot on Time’s list of the most influential candy bars of all time.


Butterfinger BB’s
Amazon

Butterfinger BB’s

These bite-sized offerings, introduced in 1992, seemed to solve one of the most annoying issues of the crispety, crunchety, peanut-buttery Butterfinger: They were small enough to pop in your mouth whole, eliminating those pesky orange flakes from your fingers and clothes. Today, Butterfinger Bites attempt to fill the void, but they’re just not the same. Some impassioned fans would agree: There’s even a Facebook group devoted to bringing back the BB’s.


Reggie! Bar
eBay
Peach Blossoms
Amazon

Peach Blossoms

Despite tasting nothing like peaches, Peach Blossoms (really crunchy, candy-coated peanut butter) endured for more than a century. First made in 1905 by Necco, they stuck around until 2018, when Necco closed its doors. Though Spangler Candy Company saved the company’s eponymous Necco Wafers, Peach Blossoms weren’t as lucky. 


Choco’Lite Bar
eBay

Choco’Lite Bar

Nestle’s Choco’Lite was a big seller after hitting the market in the early ‘70s — just check out this delightfully wholesome commercial touting its release. The “puffed milk chocolate with crispy chips” might be best described as a combination of two still-available Nestle bars, the Crunch and the Aero. Despite finding plenty of fans, Nestle pulled the plug on Choco’Lite sometime in the ‘80s, according to Collecting Candy.

Life Savers Holes
eBay

Life Savers Holes

Perk up, ‘90s kids, because this one’s for you. The decade dawned not just with “Home Alone” and George H.W. Bush’s war on broccoli, but with tubes of fruity Life Savers Holes on seemingly every shelf in the country. These colorful, pellet-sized candies weren’t on the market long before being pulled because the packaging posed a choking hazard. Though they were quickly reintroduced, Life Savers Holes didn’t stick around for much longer, possibly because they were siphoning sales from other Life Savers brands

Caravelle Bar
eBay

Caravelle Bar

This candy bar of the ‘70s and ‘80s was a tasty combination of chocolate, caramel, and crisped rice, but it’s probably better remembered for its whimsical commercials. This Peter Paul creation stuck around until the late ‘80s, then disappeared — perhaps because it was a bit too similar to the still-in-production Nestle 100 Grand. 

Alpine White Bar
eBay

Alpine White Bar

White chocolate remains one of the most polarizing treats out there. But love it or hate it, you have to respect Nestle for leaning all the way in with its almond-studded Alpine White bar, proudly made with just five ingredients. This candy bar of the ‘80s also happened to have what might be the most ‘80s of commercials, which will live on in infamy thanks to YouTube.

Bub’s Daddy Gum
Candy Wrapper Museum

Bub’s Daddy Gum

If you have hazy memories from the ‘60s or ‘70s of picking up a loooong tube of bubble gum in striped packaging from the store, chances are good it was Bub’s Daddy. It was made by the Donruss company (perhaps better known for making baseball cards), and while Bub’s Daddy seems to have disappeared in the ‘80s, the formula actually lives on in another form, as Ferrara’s Supper Bubble

Milkshake Bar
Candy Wrapper Museum