Bison
Mark Newman/Getty

Incredible Photos of Wild Animals Across America

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Bison
Mark Newman/Getty

The Wild Side

According to WorldAtlas, North America is home to around 457 species of mammals, 662 reptiles, more than 300 amphibians, and 914 birds. But, of course, most of us don't see wild animals on a regular basis, beyond the occasional squirrel or bird in our yard. Enter wildlife photographers, whose work gives us a glimpse into a world many of us would never otherwise see. Here are some of our favorite shots of wildlife in locations from the lower reaches of Florida to the upper expanses of Alaska. 


Related: 12 Places Nature Is Thriving as Humans Retreat During the Lockdown

Snowy Owl
Vicki Jauron/Getty
Mule Deer
Bryant Aardema/Getty

Mule Deer

A mule deer catches sight of a photographer while grazing in Utah. Indigenous to the American West, these animals are known to eat a wide array of vegetation, according to the Arizona Sonora Desert Museum, including mesquite leaves and beans, fairy duster, jojoba, catclaw, buckbrush, and other shrubs and grasses.


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Brown Bear
Mint Images/ Art Wolfe/Getty
Great Egret
Troy Harrison/Getty

Great Egret

A great egret stands among wetland marsh reeds in an Everglades National Park sunrise. This species is just one of around 360 different types of bird that have been discovered within the park. 

Bald Eagle
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Bald Eagle

An American bald eagle flies near the Grand Tetons mountain range in Wyoming. While it's estimated that around 200 of this species live in Wyoming, bald eagles are found in all 48 continental states as well as Alaska, which has the largest population with an estimated 30,000.

Bison
Mark Newman/Getty

Bison

A herd of bison walks down the middle of a Yellowstone National Park road during the winter. A recent study noted that the park's current bison population, which lies somewhere between 3,000 and 5,000, may number more than at any point in history. 


Related: Best National Parks to Visit in Winter


Manatee
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Manatee

A manatee swims underwater in Florida's Crystal River north of Tampa. The area is home to a wide array of wildlife and includes Crystal River Preserve State Park and the Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge

Mountain Goat
Wendy/Jeff Sparks/Torquemada/Getty
Texas Horned Lizard
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Texas Horned Lizard

This animal, also known as a horned toad, gazes skyward in the Arizona desert at sunset. Though they're known to eat a variety of insects, Texas horned lizards feed on mostly harvester ants. 

 

Bobcat
Kevin Schafer/Getty

Bobcat

This native North American cat pauses to take a look around in Utah's Uinta National Forest. The species is crepuscular, which means it's most active around twilight, moving between 2 to 7 miles each night in a habitual pattern. 


Related: 33 Historic National Park Photos for Vintage Views


Pelican
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Red Fox
Grant Ordelheide/Getty

Red Fox

This member of the Vulpes vulpes family looks curiously at a photographer near Winter Park, Colorado. Though it appears alone, red foxes usually travel with mates or small familial groups.

Grey Wolf
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Grey Wolf

Wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park — where this one was photographed — in 1995, with more relocated to the park in 1996 and 1997. In 2019, the overall population in Yellowstone was around 94.

Key Deer
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Key Deer

A Key deer stag and fawn nuzzle one another in the Florida Keys. This species of deer, which is endangered, live on 20 to 25 islands in the Keys region, swimming between islands in search of fresh water and food. 


Related: 31 Bucket-List Experiences in America's National Parks

Harbor Seal
Vicki Jauron/Getty
Prairie Dogs
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Prairie Dogs

A pair of prairie dogs appear to hug near York, Maine. It's estimated that the U.S. has somewhere between 10 and 20 million of these small mammals, although that number also represents a 95% decline. 

Mandarin Duck
Vicki Jauron/Getty

Mandarin Duck

Swimming in New York's Central Park, this colorful bird native to parts of Africa, Europe, and Asia first appeared in the park in 2018, prompting all manner of media coverage. Sightings remained rare until December 2019 — the duck has not been seen since. 

Racoon
Vicki Jauron/Getty

Snowy Egret Chick

This wild-haired baby bird lets his feelings be known on a small island in the Great South Bay of Long Island. A member of the heron family, young snowy egrets eventually grow into elegant and long-legged birds known for their remarkable plumage.

Racoon
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Racoon

This animal, native to North America, reaches toward a flower in Victoria, Minnesota. Raccoons are omnivorous, eating plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates.

Short-Tailed Weasel
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Short-Tailed Weasel

Also known as a stoat or ermine, this animal was photographed on Kodiak Island in Alaska. In addition to North America, it is also native to Eurasia.

American Flamingos
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American Flamingos

Three flamingos look like they're having a confab in Naples, Florida. There are six different species of flamingo but only one — the American Flamingo — can be found in the U.S.

Grizzly Bear
Paul Souders/Getty
Gold-Mantled Ground Squirrel
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Gold-Mantled Ground Squirrel

A member of the Sciuridae family, this animal appears to be reaching for the heavens in Yellowstone National Park.

Moose
Jeff R Clow/Getty
Knight Anole Lizard
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Knight Anole Lizard

A member of the Anolis equestris family hangs out on a tree in the Everglades in Florida. The largest species of anole, this reptile is fiercely territorial and eats mostly insects and snails.

Rainbow Grasshopper
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Rainbow Grasshopper

Also known as painted grasshoppers, the species is native to North America and can be found in landscapes of shortgrass prairie and desert grasslands throughout the American West. This one was photographed near Albuquerque, New Mexico. 


Polar Bears
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Polar Bears

A pair of polar bears sit on the beach near Kaktovik, Alaska on Barter Island, near the northernmost part of the state.

Northern Leopard Frog
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Northern Leopard Frog

A member of this frog species chills on a toadstool near Boulder Junction, Wisconsin. This animal, the state amphibian of Minnesota and Vermont, comes in many different color variations.

Mountain Bluebird
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Chipmunk
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Chipmunk

A chipmunk — cheeks stuffed full of food — hangs out on a rock near Frisco, Colorado. These industrious little critters can gather upward of 150 acorns in one day.