Crab Louie
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15 Old-School Dishes Making a Comeback at Restaurants

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Crab Louie
Elva L./yelp

Yesterday's Specials

We all know the good ol' days never really existed, but it's easy to get sucked into romanticizing the past — who wouldn't want to grab a martini with Don Draper or go for a country drive with Grace Kelly? Luckily for us romantics, many of the star dishes of the past are getting a reboot at restaurants across the country. Read on for old-school dishes making a comeback, plus recipes for each if you'd like to throw a retro feast of your own. Looking for more old school institutions serving up the classics? Check out 60 Iconic U.S. Restaurants to Try Before You Die.

Oysters Rockefeller
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Oysters Rockefeller

Oysters Rockefeller may sound opulent and inaccessible, but really it's just oysters on the half shell topped with a creamy sauce of butter, herbs, and bread crumbs. The dish was created at Antoine's in New Orleans in 1899 — supposedly, the sauce was so rich that they named it after the nation's richest man, John D. Rockefeller. You can still find it on the menu at Antoine's, or at J's Oyster in Portland, Maine, and Oceanaire Seafood Room in Boston. 

Recipe: Taste of Home

Related: 26 Best Cheap Or Free Things To Do In New Orleans

Beef Wellington
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Beef Wellington

Want to pretend you're in a movie with Cary Grant? Order some beef Wellington — filet mignon coated with foie gras, wrapped in prosciutto, and baked in puff pastry. Wowza. Cocotte in San Francisco has an excellent version of it on the menu, as does Highlands in New York City.

Recipe: Tyler Florence

Related: The Best Under-the-Radar Steakhouse in All 50 States

Lobster Thermidor
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Lobster Thermidor

Lobster thermidor sounds like something your grandfather would have ordered at a fancy business lunch, and that's pretty much what it is. Creamy, rich, and elegant, it's the perfect extra-special entrée order, especially alongside an equally decadent wine such as Champagne or white Burgundy. Boathouse Bistro in Boothbay Harbor, Maine, serves the classic; Tadich Grill in San Francisco has it on the menu with lobster and crab. To make it at home, try the following 1941 recipe from Gourmet.

Recipe: Epicurious

Related: The Best Seafood Restaurant in All 50 States

Escargot with Garlic-Parsley Butter
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Escargot with Garlic-Parsley Butter

In an age where we're looking for more sustainable meat options, it's no wonder escargot (otherwise known as snails) are making a comeback. In Milwaukee, you can try them at Story Hill BKC; in Louisville, head to Jack Fry's. Wherever you enjoy them, Burgundy is the classic wine pairing. 

Recipe: Bon Appetit

Related: 27 Unusual Canned Foods You Might Actually Want to Eat

Crab Louie
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Crab Louie

Crab Louie, despite its kingly name, is basically a green salad with crab meat and a mayo-based dressing. It's easy to make at home, though it also can be found at Butcher and Singer in Philadelphia or at Swan Oyster Depot in San Francisco under the name "Crabsanthemum." Pair with a refreshing white wine such as Muscadet. 

Recipe: Food & Wine

Related: 20 Free and Cheap Things to Do in San Francisco

Chopped Chicken Liver
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Chopped Chicken Liver

"What am I, chopped liver?" Probably not, but this savory substance popular in days of yore is increasingly trendy once again. Try Russ & Daughters Cafe in New York or Langer's in Los Angeles for the classic. The holidays — including Hanukkah — are a good time to try this combination of egg, butter, onion, and, of course, chicken liver. 

Recipe: Food & Wine

Related: 25 Best Delis Across America

Duck a L'Orange
L'Antagoniste

Duck a L'Orange

The acidity and freshness of the orange sauce help brighten the natural richness of the duck meat. Try it at L'Antagoniste in Brooklyn or Le Petit Paris in Chicago, but know that you'll have to order it with its entirely French name of Canard a L'Orange. If you're throwing a dinner party and really want to wow the guests, Jacque Pepin has you covered. 

Recipe: Food & Wine

https://blog.cheapism.com/cheap-red-and-processed-meat-substitutes-4075/

Clams Casino
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Clams Casino

Baked clams with bacon, breadcrumbs, and often green pepper on the half shell, the dish is simple, delicious, and worth a try. Head to Abe & Louie's in Boston or Jimmy's Famous Seafood in Baltimore. Everything's better with bacon

Recipe: Giada De Laurentiis

Deviled Eggs
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Deviled Eggs

Deviled eggs are a delicious, adaptable little appetizer. Find them in Maine, at The Portland Hunt & Alpine Club, or at Magnolias in Charleston, South Carolina. They're keto, gluten-free, high in protein, and full of flavor, so enjoy without guilt. Keep an eye out for how many come to the table, though — it's a curiosity of the restaurant world that the appetizer is usually served with an odd-number of halved eggs. Where's the other half of that egg? 

Recipe: Mary Nolan

Related: 13 Simple Ways to Cook Eggs

Tuna Casserole
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Tuna Casserole

If there's a dish that says "your midwestern grandma loves you," it's the casserole. Endlessly cozy and adaptable, it's no wonder it's making its way back to menus. For those in Cincinnati, Sweets & Meats BBQ has sweet potato casserole; in Louisville, Kentucky, one can find sweet potato and broccoli versions at Dasha Barbours Southern Bistro. But tuna casserole is the true classic. 

Recipe: The Kitchn

Related: 45 Comfort Foods for a Cozy Fall Meal

Meatloaf
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Pork Rinds
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Pork Rinds

In a world where keto and low-carb reign, pork rinds suddenly sound like a reasonable snack again — like potato chips, minus the carbs! In Salt Lake City, you can find pork rinds at Pig & a Jelly Jar; CBD Provisions in Dallas also has them on the menu. Brave souls with 15 hours or so to spare can make these chicharrónes at home. 

Recipe: Cooking Channel

Related: 23 Traditional Hispanic Foods Most Americans Don't Know About (but Should)

Baked Alaska
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Baked Alaska

Baked Alaska is ice cream cake topped with a browned meringue, making for a dish that's cold and warm all at once (and in the right setting is lit on fire tableside when it's served). Order this sort-of-fancy retro dessert at Delmonico's in New York City (where it was created in 1867 by Charles Ranhofer) and at Bistro Daisy in New Orleans. If you make it at home, be sure to cover every inch of ice cream with meringue before it goes in the oven, or you'll have a melted mess. 

Recipe: Martha Stewart

Related: 25 Betty Crocker-Era Holiday Recipes That We Secretly Love

The Old-Fashioned
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The Old-Fashioned

If you really want to get old fashioned with your dinner, there's nothing like ordering the classic cocktail. Muddle sugar with bitters, add whiskey (sometimes brandy), and there you have it. Wisconsin does old-fashioneds very well, especially at the aptly named The Old Fashioned in Madison. Or head to The Whiskey House in San Diego for a whole menu of riffs on the drink.

Recipe: Esquire

Related: How to Fully Stock Your Bar for Under $300

The Rob Roy
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The Rob Roy

This scotch-based cocktail was invented at the Waldorf Astoria in 1894. It's slowly making its way back to prominence — try it at Gilt Bar in Chicago and Cherry Point in Brooklyn, New York. It's also easy to make yourself. (It's a Manhattan, but with scotch.) 

Recipe: Imbibe

Related: 30 of the World's Most Iconic Hotels