15 Amazing Places to Visit During Black History Month

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HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE

February is Black History Month, spurring people across the country to visit museums, historical sites, and landmarks dedicated to the sacrifices and contributions of black Americans, from slavery and abolition to war service and cultural influence. These institutions promote education and activism while honoring the lives and legacies of black Americans. Many have free admission, and visitors can enter every site on this list for $15 or less.
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BUFFALO SOLDIERS NATIONAL MUSEUM (HOUSTON)

African-Americans have fought in every American war, and the Buffalo Soldiers National Museum honors their service and legacy. Created in the immediate aftermath of the Civil War, the so-called "Buffalo Soldier" regiments were the first peacetime all-black units in the regular U.S. Army. The museum hosts historical artifacts, memorabilia, photographs, and videos about the Buffalo Soldiers and the service of African-Americans in all wars. General admission is $10, or $5 for students, seniors, and service members with military ID. Kids 5 and under enter free.
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MUSEUM OF THE NATIONAL CENTER OF AFRO-AMERICAN ARTISTS (BOSTON)

Visitors here can explore the worldwide African diaspora through the visual arts. Paintings, sculptures, decorative arts, photography, and graphics make up just some of the exhibitions at the museum. Educational programs are available for children and adults. Current exhibits include "Black Gods Live: Work of Stephen Hamilton" and "Aspelta -- A Nubian King's Burial Chamber." Admission is $5 for adults and $4 for children.
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TUSKEGEE AIRMEN NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE (TUSKEGEE, ALABAMA)

The Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site honors one of the most important challenges to the color barrier in the pre-Civil Rights era. The Tuskegee Airmen were started as an experiment by the Army Air Corps in World War II to determine whether African-Americans could fly in combat, maintain aircraft, and lead troops. Visitors can see memorabilia and hear the stories of the men and women who challenged military segregation. The public can visit the hangar museums free of charge.

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COLONEL ALLENSWORTH STATE HISTORIC PARK (EARLIMART, CALIFORNIA)

In 1908, Colonel Allen Allensworth led a small group of settlers to the remote San Joaquin Valley in California. Hoping to escape the oppression and lack of opportunity that black Americans faced in most of the country, they created California's only town founded, financed, and governed by African-Americans. The town didn't last, but in 1974, the state purchased the land, restored the buildings, and turned it into a historical site. Camping, tours, and bike trails are available at the park.
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JIM CROW MUSEUM OF RACIST MEMORABILIA (BIG RAPIDS, MICHIGAN)

The mission statement of this museum is "using objects of intolerance to teach tolerance and promote social justice." The museum examines the racist stereotypes and caricatures that permeated America for generations after the Civil War. Visitors will encounter videos, imagery, essays, memorabilia, and artifacts -- many of them disturbing -- that chronicle the attitudes behind decades of racial discrimination and violence. Admission is free.
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KINGSLEY PLANTATION (JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA)

Florida's 150-year legacy of slavery comes to life at Kingsley Plantation in Jacksonville, where hundreds of slaves toiled, lived, and died in the service of the Zephaniah Kingsley family. The immersive experience includes audio storytelling, archaeology workshops for teachers, and a heritage celebration. Weekend house tours take visitors through the lavish Kingsley mansion and the cluster of tiny, crude cabins where the slaves lived. Admission is free.
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NICODEMUS NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE (KANSAS)

After the Civil War, droves of freed slaves fled their former masters in Kentucky for the promise of safety and freedom in Kansas. This organized mass migration led to the establishment of the town of Nicodemus, one of the earliest settlements of the Great Plains by African-Americans during the postwar westward expansion. Visitors to Nicodemus National Historic Site can examine the town's original five buildings and census records, and participate in archaeological digs. There is no fee to visit the park.
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NATIONAL UNDERGROUND RAILROAD FREEDOM CENTER (CINCINNATI)

The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center pays tribute to the legendary clandestine network that shuttled runaway slaves to the north. Current exhibits include "Cincinnati's Soldiers: Men and Women of the First World War," "Open Your Mind," and "Trafficking: The Road to Freedom." Adults can visit the Freedom Center for $15; seniors enter for $13; and children 3 to 12 get in for $12.50.
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NEGRO LEAGUES BASEBALL MUSEUM (KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI)

The creation of baseball's Negro Leagues was one of the most famous examples of segregation in the history of American sports. Visitors to the museum can explore that history through hundreds of photographs and memorabilia dating from the late-1800s to the 1960s, along with multimedia displays and tours of the 10,000-square-foot facility, which shares space with the American Jazz Museum. Admission is $10 for adults, $9 for seniors, and $6 for kids 5 to 12. (Note: The museum is scheduled to be closed for upgrades and repairs until Feb. 7.)
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BIRMINGHAM CIVIL RIGHTS INSTITUTE (ALABAMA)

In the modern Civil Rights movement, few cities carry more symbolic weight than Birmingham. The Birmingham Civil Rights Institute was among the first in the nation to preserve the history and narratives of the people who fought on both sides. It offers numerous exhibits on the heroes, tragedies, and milestones of the Civil Rights era. Visitors can see the cell that held the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. when he wrote the historic Letter from Birmingham Jail in 1963. Tickets are $15; $5 for seniors; $6 for college students; $4 for children 4 to 12; and free for children who are residents of Jefferson County, Alabama.
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MUSEUM OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY (MASSACHUSETTS)

Visitors to the Museum of African-American History's twin campuses in Boston and Nantucket can feel the power of standing where Frederick Douglass once stood as the most visible abolitionist in the world. The museum's Freedom Rising education programs celebrate the efforts of 19th-century African-Americans to achieve freedom through education. The "Picturing Frederick Douglass" exhibit is a massive collection of images of one of the 19th century's most-photographed men. A walking tour of the Black Heritage Trail chronicles the Boston community that was the epicenter of the abolition movement. Entry is $5 for adults and $3 for youth and seniors.

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MOTOWN MUSEUM (DETROIT)

Berry Gordy founded Motown Records in 1959 and forever changed American music. The museum greets visitors with artifacts, photos, and memorabilia dedicated to the genre and the era. Guests can stand in Studio A, where some of the greatest music in Motown history was created, including hits by Stevie Wonder, the Jackson 5, and Marvin Gaye. Tickets are $15 for adults and $10 for seniors and youth. Children under 5 are free. Tickets are first come, first served, and it's common for the museum to sell out, especially on Saturdays.
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LITTLE ROCK CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL (ARKANSAS)

School desegregation began in earnest in 1957, when nine brave students attempted to enter Little Rock Central High School. They were initially refused entry by the governor of the state, but walked through the doors under the protection of the National Guard on the orders of President Dwight Eisenhower. A permanent exhibition commemorates the events. Short walking tours are also available. Tours are free but must be scheduled at least 24 hours in advance for a maximum of 50 guests (no minimum required).
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NATIONAL VOTING RIGHTS MUSEUM (SELMA, ALABAMA)

Located at the foot of the historic Edmund Pettus Bridge is a testament to the one of the greatest prizes in the struggle for civil rights: the right to vote. The National Voting Rights Museum is home to exhibits on Martin Luther King Jr., nonviolence, the Ku Klux Klan, and John F. Kennedy, along with other educational displays chronicling the long, bloody battle for voting rights. Admission is $6.50 for adults and $4.50 for senior citizens and students.
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NATIONAL GREAT BLACKS IN WAX MUSEUM (BALTIMORE)

One of the most unique museums in the country, the National Great Blacks in Wax Museum greets visitors with lifelike wax replicas of some of history's most important black figures, including American icons W.E.B. DuBois, Bessie Coleman, and Malcolm X. There are also figures representing the Middle Passage, the Underground Railroad, entrepreneurialism in America, and more. Admission is $15 for adults, $14 for seniors and students, $12 for children, and free for children under 3.

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