Bealach na Ba, sunrise, Applecross, Scotland
lucentius/istockphoto

20 Bucket-List RV Road Trips Around the World

View Slideshow
Cheapism is editorially independent. We may earn a commission if you buy through links on our site. Learn more
Triberg in Black Forest Germany Autumn
Pusteflower9024/istockphoto

Road Trip Ready

If you’re ready to hit the road for an epic RV adventure, there are plenty of beautiful places to travel. Although RVing is extremely popular in the United States, there are many worldwide RV destinations you won’t want to miss. RVers from around the world share their bucket list RV road trips, so keep reading to get all the insider details. 


Related: Bucket List RV Trips Across America

Bow River, Castle Mountain, Banff National Park Canada, wildflowers, copyspace
dszc/istockphoto

Canadian Rockies National Park Road Trip

Canada is full of bucket list RV trips. One can’t-miss journey is through the Canadian Rocky Mountains. This stunning landscape is complete with towering mountains, crystal blue waters, and animals galore. If you start from Calgary, can’t-miss stops throughout the Rockies include Banff National Park with Lake Louise and Moraine Lake, Yoho National Park, and Jasper. 


Traveling in a smaller RV is preferable, as some of the mountain roads can be quite narrow. It will also make finding a place to park at trailheads much easier. Be sure to arrive at your destination early in the prime time for tourists or you’ll never find a parking spot. 


Related: Stunning RV Camping Destinations Across Canada


Aerial view of Wasaga Beach
mirceax/istockphoto

Canada’s Lake Superior Circle

Canada is enormous, so it is impossible to choose just one RV road trip. Another can’t-miss circuit is Canada’s Lake Superior Circle. For U.S. travelers, it is easy to enter Canada and head to Thunder Bay through Northern Minnesota. This RV trip takes you around the northern portion of Lake Superior, the world’s largest freshwater lake. 


Along the way around Lake Superior, you’ll want to plan stops at Lake Superior Provincial Park, Manitoulin Island, Bruce Peninsula National Park, Sauble Beach, Owen Sound, the Blue Mountains, and Wasaga Beach before ending in Toronto. Go RVing Canada recommends allowing at least 14 days to complete this trip and enjoy all the sites. 


Related: 15 of the Best Road Trips in Canada


Country Road in British Columbia
WildLivingArts/istockphoto

Canada’s The Great Northern Circle

This two-week adventure will take you through some of Canada’s most remote and beautiful wilderness. If you need a place to disconnect and get away from the hustle and bustle, this is the place to do it. 


Be sure to stay fueled up and restock on supplies when you have the chance. This bucket list RV trip has many remote locations along the way. The journey is best kicked off from Prince George, known as the Gateway to the North. According to Go RVing Canada, not to be missed destinations include Pine Pass, Tumbler Ridge, Dawson Creek, Fort Nelson, the Northern Rockies, Liard River Hot Springs, Watson Lake, the Salmon Glacier, and Smithers. 


Related: Little-Known Facts About RVs


Velden at the Wörthersee in Carinthia, Austria
mdworschak/istockphoto

Austria

Travel blogger and van lifer Ryan Clarke recommends RV world travelers make a stop in Austria. Clarke says the perfect 10-day Austria road trip itinerary includes stops at Lake Worthersee, Vienna, Wachau Valley, Styrian Enns Valley, and Salzburg. 


Austria brings together the perfect combination of outdoor beauty and cultural experiences. Traveling with a smaller RV like a campervan makes navigating the sometimes narrow streets easier. You will also need a vignette, which you can purchase at most gas stations, to display in your windshield in order to travel on the roads. Boondocking or wild camping, as it is called in Europe, is not allowed in Austria, so make sure you book yourself some campground stays. 


For more great travel guides and vacation tips, please sign up for our free newsletters.


Aerial image at Desenzano del Garda
Paul Antonescu/istockphoto

Italy

An RV trip to Italy is not without its struggles, says Clarke. For example, finding places to dump the tanks or find free parking can be a challenge. However, he is thankful the logistics didn’t deter him from taking an Italian road trip. Although Clarke spent 3½ weeks on the road, you could break the trip up to narrow in on a few more specific areas of Italy. If you’ve got the time though, you should have the following on your itinerary: Pisa, Volterra, Siena, Val D-Orcia, Cascate del Mulino- Saturnia, Lake Bolsena, Pompeii, Adriatic Coast, Lake Como, Lake Garda, Sirmione, Desenzano del Garda, Venice, Milan, and Rome. 


Another Italian highlight is the Amalfi Coast, but Clarke cautions, “We definitely do not recommend taking a large motorhome or campervan to the Amalfi Coast.” Instead, rent a car for the day because you really won’t want to miss this while you’re already in Italy. 


Related: The Best Hidden Gem Destinations, According to RV Experts


Panoramic view of Lake Bled from Mt. Osojnica, Slovenia
AlbertoLoyo/istockphoto

Slovenia

Slovenia is a smaller European country, which means you can complete an RV road trip and hit all the major sights in as little as five days. Full-time travelers Lars and Shelley of Lifejourney4two recommend the following Slovenia Road trip itinerary: Postojna and Predjama, Lake Bled, Kamniska Bistrica, and ultimately ending in the county’s capital, Ljubljana. Along the way, you’ll see sweeping mountain vistas, charming European towns, and, of course, a castle or two. 


The nice thing for American travelers is that in Slovenia, you drive on the right side of the road. As of this writing, an international driver’s license also isn’t required, but be sure to check before embarking on your trip in case things change. Similar to Austria, you need a vignette, which is basically a sticker you must pay for and display in your window in order to travel on the roadways. You are also required to have a warning triangle in your vehicle, according to Lars and Shelley. 


Bealach na Ba, sunrise, Applecross, Scotland
lucentius/istockphoto

The Scottish 500

If you are seeking beautiful green views, ocean coastlines, culture, history, and friendly residents, Scotland’s northern coast is the place to be. Jim Campbell of Honeymoon Goals says a trip along the Scottish 500 won’t disappoint you. “When traveling the Scottish 500, it is best to give yourself at least 5 days to travel the 516 miles of coastline beginning and ending at Inverness Castle,” says Campbell. 


If you are looking to rent an RV, you’ll need to search for “campervans” as they are called in the U.K. The best time to book this trip is between May and early September, say travel bloggers Laurence and Jessica Norah. They also advise, “Bealach Na Ba is a narrow windy stretch of road near Applecross and the most difficult and steepest stretch of the official NC500 route.” You shouldn’t take a large motorhome or campervan over this stretch of road, especially if you’re inexperienced. Instead, there is an alternate and much safer route via Sheildaig, Kenmore, and Applecross Road. 


Related: Rookie Mistakes First-Time RV Drivers Make


rynisfjara black sand beach, iceland
35007/istockphoto

Iceland’s Ring Road

Iceland's Ring Road is packed with epic landscapes and is easy to drive, say travel bloggers Katie and Ben Zweber. From popular but worthwhile stops, like Reynisfjara Black Sand Beach, to hard-to-reach gems, like Studlagil Canyon, traveling this route will be the journey of a lifetime. The Zwebers recommend you never let your gas tank get too empty, as gas stations are few and far between in some parts of the country. “Also, be sure to watch your speed, especially around cities, as there are speed cameras that will send you a hefty fine if you're caught driving above the limit,” they add. 


Los Barriles, Baja California Sur
MattGush/istockphoto

Baja Peninsula

If beach vibes are your jams, the Baja Peninsula should be your next RV road trip, says Zach Lazzari of Busted Oarlock. Lazzari has been traveling Mexico and the Americas by campervan and says driving from La Paz to Los Barriles provides travelers with tons of beach access and many welcoming small towns to stop at. If you have the time, you can’t go wrong traveling the entire Baja Peninsula.


It is important to note you should make sure your RV insurance covers you in Mexico. Some plans do, but you may need to get special insurance if driving to Mexico from the U.S. Of course, you also don’t want to forget your passport. 


Sian Ka'an Biosphere Reserve
SerafinoMozzo/istockphoto

Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico

Nature and culture collide in Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula. Here you’ll be able to travel by RV to see beautiful beaches and Mayan ruins. Martin Betch, co-founder of Hivan, recommends stops at Bacalar and Campeche besides the many beaches dotting the coast. Zweber also recommends traveling to the Yucatan Peninsula and suggests making stops at Chichén Itzá, Uxmal, Coba, and the Sian Ka’an Biosphere Reserve


Betch warns that road conditions in Mexico can be poor, so a smaller campervan or truck top camper would allow you to reach destinations more easily. Betch also says you should never leave valuables in your vehicle. He also recommends storing your money in several places in the RV in case corrupt police officers stop you. That way, you won’t lose everything if this problem happens to you. 


Related: Incredible Ancient Ruins Across North America


Villa De Leyva In Colombia
traveler1116/istockphoto

Colombia

South America isn’t on many people’s radars for RV travels, but if you skip this continent, you’ll be missing out. Colombia has a mix of outdoor adventure, colonial towns, and bustling cities. Eric Yu of AsoboLife says the top destinations for Colombian overlanders are Barichara, Mongui, Guatape, Cucuy National Park, Medellin, and Villa de Leyva.  


“Like many other international RV travelers, we primarily use the Overlander app to find places to stay (paid and free). But it can be tricky, since information can often be incomplete or outdated. But that’s one of the things that makes traveling in Latin America exciting; you never know what the next day will bring,” says Yu. He also advises RVers to never drive at night, be vigilant for potholes — they’re everywhere —, add 50% to Google’s estimated travel time, and keep calm if other drivers like transport trucks have road rage issues. 


Related: Under-the-Radar Destinations in Latin America


The Milford Sound fiord. Fiordland national park, New Zealand
primeimages/istockphoto

New Zealand’s South Island

“The most incredible RV road trip I’ve taken outside of the U.S. was a tour of the south island in New Zealand—essentially just following the roads around the island,” says Ravi Parikh, CEO of RoverPass. You’ll be greeted with gorgeous coastal views throughout the entire length of the trip. Parikh says you should make Milford Sound a must-see on your journey around the South Island. 


Driving tips for New Zealand are to take your time to acclimate to driving on the left side of the road. The roads in New Zealand are a bit more rugged and narrow than many drivers are accustomed to, says Parikh, so a smaller, off-road capable RV or campervan might be better for this trip. 


New Chums
David P. Hilss/istockphoto

New Zealand’s North Island

Why stop at seeing only part of New Zealand? Katie Zweber advises that for outdoor lovers, your North Island road trip itinerary includes Coromandel Peninsula, New Chums Beach, Hot Water Beach, Rotorua, and Lake Taupo. If you want to switch things up and visit New Zealand's two largest cities, there is also plenty to do in Auckland and Wellington. Here you will find parks, museums, and world-class dining. Zweber recommends allowing at least two weeks to get the most out of your North New Zealand RV road trip. If you have more time, even better, she says. 


Peneda-Gerês National Park
Zed Jameson/istockphoto

Portugal

Portugal absolutely has to be on a list of spectacular, once-in-a-lifetime RV road trips, says Michal Grupa at Siesta Campers. The combination of a mild climate translating to roughly nine months of summer, endless coastlines, a low cost of living, and ease of access for international visitors is propelling Portugal to the top of popular destinations lists worldwide. Can’t-miss stops for the perfect Portugal campervan road trip include the Algarve, Libson, Penela, Peneda-Gerês National Park, and Porto, according to Dariece Swift of Goats on the Road. 


Swift also says to make sure you stop and pay manually at all the toll road gates. Otherwise, you’ll have to stop at a CTT, which is the Portuguese postal service, to pay the toll between two and five business days after your drive. You will have an easier time of things if you can rent a campervan that includes a Via Verde tag which automatically charges you for tolls. Swift also recommends steering clear of most cities as driving in a large vehicle can be a challenge. Instead, enjoy the great wide open. 



The Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia
TonyFeder/istockphoto

East Coast of Australia

The east coast of Australia is a popular tourist destination for travelers worldwide. Stretching from Queensland to Victoria, the east coast is home to some of the country's most iconic landmarks, including the Great Barrier Reef and the Sydney Opera House. “Driving is a great way to see the east coast, and there are plenty of rental companies that offer campervans,” says Wade Badby of Travel with Wade and Dani, who is traveling the east coast of Australia at the time of this writing. 


Badby says there are some things to keep in mind when driving in Australia. “First, the speed limit is generally lower than in other countries, so be sure to follow signs and drive at a safe speed.” Australian roads can also be very narrow and winding, so it's important to take your time and drive defensively, Badby says. This isn’t the place to travel if you aren’t confident driving a larger vehicle like a campervan. Finally, Badby recommends carrying a map with you, as cell reception can be spotty in rural areas. 


Triberg in Black Forest Germany Autumn
Pusteflower9024/istockphoto

Southwest Germany

The southwestern portion of the country is overflowing with places to stop on your German RV road trip. After traveling far and wide, the RVers at Lifejourney4two recommend making stops in the Black Forest, Landenburg, Sasbachwalden, Gengenbach, and Triberg. You’ll experience a mix of nature and culture on this bucket list RV road trip. 


According to Lifejourney4two, Germany requires travelers to carry several safety supplies with them. They include a reflective vest, first aid kit, headlamp beam deflectors, and a warning triangle. In some parts of Germany, there is no speed limit, but make sure you travel at a safe speed for a motorhome. Always travel in the right lane except to pass and use extreme caution when passing in a motorhome since you will probably travel much slower than others who may come behind you in the left lane. 


Autumn morning view of Konigsee lake in Berchtesgaden national park, Germany
rusm/istockphoto

Southeast Germany

If you have time to extend your RV road trip, a tour of Southeast Germany is another can’t-miss adventure. Lifejourney4two recommends making stops at Lake Walchenseee, Konigssee Lake, and Berchtesgaden. Along the way, you’ll see mountain vistas, lakes, charming towns, and castles. 


While in the southwest portion of Germany, you can also drive to Munich to enjoy all the city offers. However, Munich isn’t as close to the rest of the destinations on this road trip, so you’ll have to account for the added time to get there. This portion of Germany has some mountainous roads, so be careful when driving.  


Les Calanques on the French Riviera
JohanSjolander/istockphoto

French Riviera

Nothing is more romantic than a road trip through the French Riviera. Jeremy Sudibyo of Indie Campers recommends spending one to two days at most of the stops along the way. This will give you ample time to explore the region with its coastal views and brightly colored cities. Your itinerary should include starting and finishing in Marseille with stops in Calanques National Park in Cassis, Hyères, Saint-Tropez, and Menton along the way.  


Phil and Izzy of the Gap Decaders have some driving tips for motorhome road trips in France. First, they say many French drivers can be impatient when stuck behind a motorhome. Stay calm and allow them to pass when it is safe. They report the roads are typically well maintained, which is fantastic for anyone driving a motorhome. You’re also required to carry some safety supplies, including reflective vests for each person in the vehicle, a warning triangle, a spare wheel and supplies to change a tire, and headlight beam converters. 


Embankment of Loire and Orleans Cathedral
bbsferrari/istockphoto

Loire Valley, France

There is too much to explore in France to have just one bucket-list RV road trip through the country. Another can’t-miss place in France is the Loire Valley. You’ll feel you’re in a fairytale as you visit all the stunning chateaux (or to the Americans in the group, castles!). Lifejourney4two recommends the following Loire Valley road trip itinerary: Château d'Ussé, Château d’Azay-le-Rideau, Château de Villandry, Château de Chenonceau, and Château de Chambord. It is nearly impossible to see all the castles in the valley, but you won’t be disappointed if you hit these five. 

Amazing aurora borealis - northern lights - view from coast in Oldervik, near Tromso city -  north Norway
Marcin Wojciechowski/istockphoto

Norway

Travelers know Norway for being very RV friendly, and it is one of a few European destinations that allows “wild camping” or camping for free on undeveloped land. There are 47 national parks in Norway, which means whichever route you choose, you’re going to end up somewhere amazing. Most rentals in Norway will be for campervans, which are smaller and easier to maneuver. 


For the ultimate Norway road trip along the western coast, The Gap Decaders recommend making stops at Bergen, Loen, Geiranger, Trollstigen, Kristiansund, Trondheim, Jektvik, Bodo, and Tromso. This trip takes 2-3 weeks, but there are some other shorter Norwegian road trips if you want to explore other areas of the country or have a tighter timeline. Along the way, you’ll see fjords (obviously, this is Norway after all), glaciers, museums, and, if you’re lucky or traveling at the right time of year, the Northern Lights.