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Amazon Warehouse Worker
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Amazon Slapped With Nearly $30,000 in Fines for Allegedly Failing to Report Injuries

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Amazon may deliver your order of new socks or an Alexa device quickly, but it may come at a cost to its employees in the form of injuries. Now failing to properly record work-related illnesses and injuries is also coming at a price to Amazon itself — to the tune of $30,000.

The retail giant is being slapped with fines after six of its warehouses in five states failed to properly some record work-related illnesses and injuries, according to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). None of the citations were deemed series. The Department of Labor agency says Amazon was given citations for 14 violations earlier this month, including misclassifying some injuries and illnesses, not recording some injuries and illnesses within the required time and not providing OSHA with timely injury and illness records, and failing to record some injuries and illnesses. As a result, Amazon faces $29,008 in proposed penalties.


The locations cited were in Florida, Illinois, New York, Idaho, and Colorado. 


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“Solving health and safety problems in the workplace requires injury and illness records to be accurate and transparent,” Doug Parker, assistant secretary for OSHA, said in a statement. “Our concern is that nothing will be done to keep an injury from recurring if it isn’t even recorded in the logbook which – in a company the size of Amazon – could have significant consequences for a large number of workers.”


Following our request for comment, Amazon spokesperson Kelly Nantel, Amazon responded, "The safety of our employees is our top priority, and we invest hundreds of millions of dollars every year into ensuring we have a robust safety program to protect them. Accurate recordkeeping is a critical element of that program and while we acknowledge there might have been a small number of administrative errors over the years, we are confident in the numbers we’ve reported to the government. We are reviewing OSHA’s allegations and are pleased that OSHA acknowledged that all of the alleged violations are “other than serious” and involve minor infractions.”


The fines don't include the July death of an Amazon employee, who died on the job during the retailer's two-day Prime Day event. OSHA opened an inspection July 14 and the investigation is ongoing.


Cheapism has reached out to Amazon for comment and will update this article if and when we hear back.


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